December 5-7, 2017
Boston, MA

Speakers

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Jeffrey Way
Senior Staff Scientist, Wyss Institute
Harvard University

Jeffrey Way, Ph.D. (CEO) is a Senior Staff Scientist at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, where he has led work on targeted fusion proteins and synthetic biology since 2009.  Dr. Way is also the founding CEO of General Biologics, Inc.; this Company’s goal is to commercialize highly engineered and tissue-targeted fusion proteins.  Previously Dr. Way was a Director of Structural Biology and Director of Intellectual Property at a Boston-based unit of Merck KGaA, where he built and led a team that evaluated and conceptualized new engineered proteins based on structural, functional, competitive and IP considerations.  He is an inventor on over 10 distinct issued patents on protein engineering and drug development, and an inventor/coauthor on additional patent applications and over 50 scientific publications on drug development, synthetic biology and basic research.  While at Merck KGaA he led preclinical R&D for an erythropoietin-based product that entered clinical trials. Dr. Way has served on the DARPA ISAT Synthetic Biology Study Group and as a judge for the iGEM synthetic biology competition. Dr. Way was a professor at Rutgers University and a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Chalfie at Columbia.  Dr. Way received his B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Vanita Sood
Global Head of Drug Structure, Prediction & Design
EMD Serono

Lead a global team of structural biologists, computational chemists and computational protein engineers. In the biologics arena our function is responsible for antibody informatics, biologics optimization, epitope characterization, using structure, modelling and data mining.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

08.30 | Panel Discussion and Open Q&A: Why CDD & Why Now?

08.00 | Atom-Rich, Data-Poor: How Can We Utilize Structural Modeling & Machine Learning Tools Together to Enhance Biologics Development?

Stanley Krystek
Senior Principal Scientist
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Dr. Krystek received his M.S. & PhD. in Biochemistry from Albany Medical College in 1989. Dr. Krystek came to Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) f in 1989 and has remained at BMS throughout his career.  Dr. Krystek focused his efforts developing computational methods for protein modeling and drug discovery applying the methods to understanding protein-protein interactions for important thereapeutic targets such as GPCRs, proteases, and NHRs. He  is a recognized expert in protein engineering and design and he plays a key role in BMS protein biologics drug discovery programs. Dr Krystek has published over 50 papers in the area of protein structure and modeling including application of QSAR methods to drug discovery, structure-based drug design and GPCR modeling. He is the co-inventor on over 20 patents.  Currently Dr. Krystek is Senior Principal Scientist in the department of Molecular Structure and Design where he leads a team that is focused on using in silico methods to support protein modeling and engineering of protein therapeutics.  He is also member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Rider University.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

10.45 | “Garbage In, Garbage Out”: Liability Models for Antigen Design

08.30 | Panel Discussion and Open Q&A: Why CDD & Why Now?

Satyendra Kumar
Scientist II
EMD Serono

I received my Ph D from University of Pune (National Institute of Virology, Pune) India in 2010. Then I came to University of Nebraska Medical Center at Omaha as a Postdoctoral fellow for brief period. Later, I joined University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Microbiology and Immunology (2010-2015), and became Visiting Research Assistant Professor in 2015. Recently, I have joined protein engineering and antibody technology department at EMD Serono as Scientist II. Since 2010, I have been working on understanding the molecular mechanism of B cell antibody diversification and development of primary and secondary antibody repertoire.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

11.15 | Computational Prediction of Antigen Driven Secondary Immune Repertoire for Novel Antibody Discovery

Rafael Depetris
Principal Scientist I
Kadmon Corporation

Rafael obtained his Ph.D. from NYU in 2008 working with Stevan Hubbard in the field of X-Ray crystallography, specifically focusing on the structural analysis of proteins that interact with the insulin receptor. His post-graduate work was done at Weill Cornell Medical College where he focused in the structural analysis of the HIV-1 Envelope proteins as well as of the HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Rafael went on to assume a position of a Senior Scientist at Pfizer CTI in New York, where he initiated his work focused on modeling of targets and therapeutic antibody candidates. He was also commanding the efforts for the humanization of the lead antibody candidates based on the modeling analyses. Rafael is continuing to explore structural features of biologics and their targets in his current position as a Principal Scientist at the Kadmon Corporation in NYC. At Kadmon he is combining his expertise in structural biology with in silico approaches to drive forward discovery projects. He has participated in many symposia, speaking about the interplay of structural analysis and computational tools.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

11.45 | Analysis of Antibody - Antigen Interactions by Directed In-Silico Modeling & Generation of Interface Fingerprints

Sarah Sirin
Structural Bioinformatician
AbbVie

Sarah Sirin received her PhD from New York University. Subsequently, she completed two postdoctoral assignments at Schrödinger and MIT working on developing and benchmarking computational tools for binding affinity and activity predictions. She joined AbbVie in 2015 where she develops and uses computational methods for biologics design and engineering.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

13.15 | Computational Antibody Design: Computational Tools for Accelerating Antibody Design & Discovery

08.30 | Panel Discussion and Open Q&A: Why CDD & Why Now?

Sandeep Somani
Senior Scientist - High Performance Computing
Janssen

During my doctoral (University of Maryland) and post-doctoral (University of Cambridge) training, I worked on various problems in atomistic simulations of biomolecules, including structure prediction, conformational sampling, protein-ligand binding and thermodynamics. At Janssen, since 2013, my work has focused on application of structural informatics, modeling and simulations for engineering protein-based drugs, mainly antibodies.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

14.15 | High-Throughput In Silico Assessment of Antibody Developability

Pratap Singh
Director
Alexion Pharmaceuticals

Pratap Singh, Ph.D., is currently a Director of Pharmacometrics at Alexion Pharmaceuticals. He manages PK/PD, translational, and systems modelling efforts for a number of clinical and non-clinical projects. Prior to joining Alexion, Pratap spent 9 years at Pfizer where he led small and large molecule modelling efforts for rare disease, inflammation, immunology and oncology research units. At Pfizer, Pratap's population modelling efforts contributed towards the regulatory approval of Taliglucerase Alpha for Gaucher's Disease. Pratap Singh received his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering where his research work contributed to the discovery of novel anti-androgens for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

15.45 | Optimal Affinity of Monoclonal Antibodies: Guiding Principles Derived from the Mechanistic Modeling Analyses

John Rhoden
Sr Research Scientist
Eli Lilly and Company

John Rhoden, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Drug Disposition at Eli Lilly and Company.  He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from N.C. State University and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from M.I.T. under the guidance of Prof. K. Dane Wittrup, after which he joined Eli Lilly and Company in 2012.  At Lilly, Dr. Rhoden serves as a large molecule ADME project leader on discovery and early development project teams in a variety of therapeutic areas including oncology, immunooncology, autoimmunity, and kidney disease.  Dr. Rhoden’s professional interests lie in using simple mathematical models to understand complex systems, interrogate hypotheses, and guide experiment design and interpretation.

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

16.15 | Design Criteria for Bispecific Antibodies: Learnings from Mathematical Modeling

Donald Mager
Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
University at Buffalo SUNY

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

16.45 | Quantitative Predictions of Target Mediated Drug Disposition of Monoclonal Antibodies from Preclinical to Clinic

Chris Roberts
Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
University of Delaware

Dr. Roberts is a Professor and the Director of the Center for Biomanufacturing Science and Technology in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware (UD). He is also the Director of the Biomolecular Interaction Technology Center, and industry-university research consortium. He received a Bachelors of Chemical Engineering degree from UD, and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University. Prior to joining UD in 2002, he worked in the pharmaceutical industry as a formulation scientist for protein and small-molecule based drugs. The Roberts laboratory focuses on fundamentals and applications of protein physical and chemical stability, (mis)folding, aggregation, kinetics, statistical mechanics, molecular modeling, and thermodynamics to address questions of biopharmaceutical product design, stability, and manufacturing.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

08.30 | Balancing Coarse-Grained & Molecular Models to Predict Low & High Concentration Protein-Protein Interactions

Dheeraj Singh Tomar
Postdoctoral Fellow
Pfizer

Dr. Tomar researches computational tools for antibody drug development. His areas of interest are viscosity, aggregation, protein-protein interactions, and structure-function relationships.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

09.00 | Predictive Tools for Developability Assessment of Antibody Molecules

Bernhardt L. Trout
Professor of Chemical Engineering
MIT

Bernhardt L. Trout is the Raymond F. Baddour, ScD, (1949) Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Novartis-MIT Center for Continuous Manufacturing. He received his S.B. and S.M. degrees from MIT and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. In addition, he performed post-doctoral research at the Max-Planck Institute. Trout’s research focuses on molecular engineering, specifically the development and application of both computational and experimental molecular-based methods to engineering pharmaceutical formulations and processes with unprecedented specificity. Since 1999, he has focused on molecular engineering for biopharmaceutical formulation, primarily liquid formulation, but also lyophilized formulation. A major aspect of his research focuses on developing both microscopic and macroscopic models to design stable formulations efficiently. In 2007, with several colleagues from MIT, he set up the Novartis-MIT Center for Continuous Manufacturing, a $85 million partnership with the objective of transforming pharmaceutical manufacturing. In addition to Novartis, he has worked with many other pharmaceutical companies in research or consulting. He has published over 180 papers and currently has 22 patents pending or issued.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

13.30 | Enabling Developability via Molecular Modeling

Tushar Jain
Senior Scientist
Adimab

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

14.00 | Machine Learning for Predicting Developability from Sequence

Feng Dong
Senior Scientist
Abbvie BioResearch Center

Feng Dong, Ph.D. is a Sr. Scientist in the Foundational Immunology at AbbVie Bioresearch Center. Dr. Dong received her Ph.D. in Physics from Drexel University with an emphasis in computational biophysics.  Following completion of her post-doctoral training in Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Dr. Dong joined Merck Research Laboratory leading the therapeutic antibody design and engineering. In 2011, Dr. Dong moved to AbbVie Bioresearch Center to extend her research on Bi-/Multi-specific antibody discovery.  Dr. Dong has extensive experience in therapeutic antibody and novel biologics discovery. She has initiated and delivered several drug candidates into clinical trials. She is a co-author for peer reviewed articles and a co-inventor for several issued and filed US and international patents.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

15.00 | Predicting Biophysical & Drug-Like Properties of Bi/Multispecific Molecules

Georg K. Gerber
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School, Co-Director
MA Host- Microbiome Center

Dr. Gerber is a computer scientist, microbiologist and physician board certified in Clinical Pathology. He is an Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology faculty, an Associate Pathologist at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics, and Co-Director of the Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center at BWH. His research interests involve building novel computational models and high-throughput experimental systems to understand the role of the microbiota in human diseases, and applying these findings to develop new diagnostic tests and therapeutic interventions to improve patient care. Dr. Gerber’s training includes a Fellowship in Infectious Disease Pathology and Molecular Microbiology at BWH, Residency in Clinical Pathology at BWH, MD from Harvard Medical School, Masters’ and PhD in Computer Science (Statistical Machine Learning, supervised by David Gifford and Tommi Jaakkola) from MIT, and Masters’ in Infectious Diseases and BA in Pure Mathematics from UC Berkeley. Prior to returning to graduate school, he founded several companies focused on developing and applying 3D graphics technologies to create feature and IMAX® films.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

15.30 | Computational Modeling of Precision Bacteriotherapies

Varun Shivashankar
Senior Scientific Computing Engineer
Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research

I received my MS in Bioinformatics from Northeastern University in Boston and my B. Tech from the Vellore Insitute of Technology in India. I have worked on several computational projects spanning genomics and drug target interactions at the Scientific Computing Group. Currently, I am working on a deeplearning framework that uses sequence, structure and experimental data to identify RNA binding motifs. We will subsequently use this information to predict RNA Binding Proteins’ binding sites along the transcriptome.

Day Two

Thursday, December 7 2017

16.00 | Identifying Global Trends Across the RNA Binding Protein (RBP) Interactome Using Deep Learning

Johannes Maier
Principal Scientist
Schrodinger

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

10.15 | A Computational Tool Set for the Detection of Liabilities in Bio-Therapeutics

John Gunn
Senior Research Scientist
Chemical Computing Group

Day One

Wednesday, December 6 2017

13.45 | Prediction of Protein-Protein Binding Sites & Epitope Mapping